January 13, 2012

1911 - adding lacing strips and boning


We're almost done with the mock-ups. Hooray. A quick reminder, the discounts offered to sew along participants expire this weekend. If you are just joining the sew along and still need a few supplies, or if you just want to take advantage of a wonderful offer, you have until this Sunday, January 15th. Thank you Caitlin and Julia for supporting the sew along!
Today we'll attach lacing strips and insert boning. You will need the lacing strips, 1 inch wide masking tape, four of the 1/2 inch wide bones.

Line the edge of the lacing strip against the center back edge of the corset. Remember how we we did not add seam allowance to the center back when tracing the pattern to muslin? It's so we can just line the edges up. My lacing strip happens to be the same length as the center back, but if yours is shorter just center it so there is an equal amount of the center back panel at the top and bottom of the strip.


Sew the strip to the back panel with a long stitch length.


I sewed through the empty channel, but you can sew next to it if you like. Now take two of the 1/2 inch wide bones and slide them in the channels at the center front.


I often fit unboned mock-ups, but a couple of bones can help when fitting. Usually I construct channels by sewing bias binding on the mock-up, but this time I'm trying something new. Tape. If I were a lady of means having a toile fit at a professional altelier and saw boning held on by tape I'd be appalled. And if I were the cutter at such an altelier I'd never dream of using tape for a paying client. But in the comfort of my own home, making a corset for myself, I can use whatever techniques I like to make the fitting process efficient and effective. And this seems like one worth checking out. So then, tape. Take a piece of 1 inch wide tape and center the boning on the sticky side. In the picture below you can see the tape, the boning, and the boning on the tape.


Tape the DIY casing near the side seam of the corset, so the third seam of the post Edwardian, or near the second on the Corsets and Crinolines pattern. Place it so the bone is near the top edge of the corset.


Mine is a bit low in the image above, but you get the idea. Here's the finished mock-up with the seam allowances showing,


and from the other side.


I'll go over fitting on Monday. If you have any questions while constructing the mock-up be sure to ask. For those of you new to sewing, don't worry if the mock up is not beautiful. It's just a tool to get us where we're going, no need get down on yourself if a seam is a bit wobbly. Have fun!

16 comments:

  1. I finished my mockup yesterday and it's wayyyy too big. I told you I was bad at math! I wonder if I should just scrap it and start over.

    I'm using your pattern for the 1911 corset. On that one, I match those measurements exactly except for the waist measurement (my waist is 28" and the pattern waist is 23"). Do you think I could just use the pattern without altering it?

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    1. Oh no! Don't start over, it's fixable. Did you take a reduction at the waist? It sounds like you may have altered the pattern to be your natural waist instead of a reduced waist. If your waist is 28 inches you'll want a 25 or 26 inch corset. If you take each seam in 1/8 inch, including the center front, and scoot the lacing strips over the same amount, that should take off a total of 2 1/2 inches from the whole corset. Try that and see if it works.

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    2. Actually, before I recommend re-sewing the seams, how big is the waistline of the mock-up? Email me at the link above and we'll figure out the right amount to remove form each panel. You should be able to take it out of the center of each panel.

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  2. Okay! I'll try that when I get home. I haven't measured the waist on my mockup, but I was actually aiming for a 26-inch waist. I think it's probably around 30 inches!

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  3. Oh my, that is too big. We'll sort it out!

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  4. I still haven't bought the boning cause I'm unsure what kind of bones I should buy. I've been told before that you should only use spiral boning in curvy places like in corset sides. I want to use the same boning as you, though, but could you just please explain why we are using flat steel? Is it period correct or better otherwise? Thanks :)

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    1. I'm using flat steel because that is what the post Edwardian corset I made the pattern from used. So it is period correct. If had been made with spiral I would have used them instead. If there were an extreme curve, say on a corset with a 6 inch waist reduction, or maybe over a substantial bust on an overbust corset, then I'd use spiral boning. Otherwise, the flat steels have plenty of flex to get the job done.

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  5. Lucky me! Your post edwardian pattern fits me like a glove without any alterations :) I might anyhow take an inch or two of the waist measurement. This will of course alter the line of the corset, but I really like small waists ;)

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    1. Yea! I love it when a pattern works!

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  6. I thought we only needed two 1/2" wide bones not four.

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  7. Yeah, I don't have four, so maybe I can just tape two 1/4" inch next to each other at that seam?

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    1. Sure. One 1/4 inch at the other seam should work too. Sorry about that, I just grabbed more 1/2 inch bones form my supply without thinking that others may only have exactly what is needed on hand for this corset. Thanks for keeping me on my toes!

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  8. AAARGGGGGHHHHH!!!!!
    I'm sooooooooo late!!!!
    I thought I could catch up in the weekend, but life got in my way...
    AND I hate the fact that I chose calicot for the mock-up... Why did I do that????
    Ah, btw, in my small eastern Italian town they have NO IDEA of what Coutille is, and that is the correct word also in Italian! And you cannot find busks... Oh, so lucky me!
    Giulia

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    1. Don't stress if you're running behind. Just keep sewing. I don't know what coutil is called in Italian, but you can substitute a tightly woven, non-stretch, plain weave or herringbone weave, cotton fabric. It doesn't have to be thick and heavy, just strong. By the way, I still haven't chosen my fabric yet!

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  9. I don't understand how you're sewing the lacing strips to the center back. Are you using a 1" seam allowance as before?

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  10. That is the one spot I didn't add a 1 inch seam allowance. If you did add on don't worry, just bump the lacing strips in 1 inch.

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