March 26, 2012

1911 - the corset on a form



Here is is, the 1911 corset, finished and on a form.



Yea! Thanks again to all of you who were along for the ride, whether you were sewing along with me or helping with suggestions. And thank you for your patience these last few weeks while I was unexpectedly away. It's nice to be back and I hope to maintain the momentum I gathered during the sew along. I'm so glad we did it! Now for more of the corset.



I realized while dressing the form that I hadn't made a bow for the center front, and I still think it can use one, but I was not going to hold off taking pictures for that. I'm very happy with the shape. I hope it looks as nice on me as it does on the form. I love the Liberty print. Love it. I also am glad I chose to add that small edge of lace beneath the trim on the top edge. It's just enough to set off the top against the black and white flowers. Let's take a look from another angle.



Not bad. You can see the start of an inflatable form blow out here, please ignore the stuffing that is falling out at the center back. That's not pretty. Look instead at the pleasing curves and long lines. Here's the view from the back.



The form is askew because as I pushed the stuffing up under the corset it started tipping off the support pole. It fell off after I snapped this and was so deflated I couldn't continue using it. I got more use out of that blow up form that expected, I guess it's time to find a real one now. But the corset looks alright. You can see the flossing arrows aim toward the center waistline on both the back and the front. The flossing on the single 1/2 inch bone is where the direction changes.


All in all, a nice corset. When I get a chance to throw it on I'll post more pictures. As always, the list of statistics.


approximately 1 yard fabric - Liberty of London cotton scarf flatlined with white cotton shirting
1- 10 inch busk
8 - 9 inch ¼ inch wide flat steel bones
8 - 16 ½ long inch ¼ inch wide flat steel bones
2 -10 inch long ½ inch wide flat steel bones
1 yard – lace
1 yard twill tape for waist stay
10 yards - 2 inch wide bias to trim top & bottom edges, bone casings & garter covering
5 yards - 3/4 inch wide bone casing
1½ yard - elastic for garters
6 garter slides and grips
40 - size double zero grommets
7 yards - double face satin ribbon or cord for lacing
1 - spool thread

number of seams picked out - 1

25 comments:

  1. Yay! It's finished, and just in time for spring, it is very pretty.

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  2. I love the mint green details. They make the corset come alive from the b&w floral pattern. Cuteness!

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  3. Soooooo pretty! But we all knew it would be. :)

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  4. Ooh, it's beautiful! You do such lovely work.

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  5. Other than "akdfglkasdfh", all I can think of is http://i0.kym-cdn.com/photos/images/original/000/119/924/sweetjesus.jpg?1304464078

    I would say "it's like corset porn" as well, but it would come off other than intended.

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  6. That is so beautiful! I love the color combinations... I wouldn't think to spice up black and white with a seafoam/turquoise color, but it works wonderfully.

    Unfortunately I got sidetracked from the sew along with another corset (which I actually completed!) and school... I should really get back on track and finish this one. >_>

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  7. I have so enjoyed your information on the 1911 corset. I have my grandmother's 400-page diary written every day in 1916, the year she turned 21. She includes comments about sewing, crocheting, buying ribbon for her girdle, etc. Do you think she would have worn this type of corset? I include diary entries in my blog: http://starwoodquilter.blogspot.com/2012/02/calico-spools-quilt-block.html

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    1. It is very possible that your grandmother wore a foundation garment similar to this type of corset!

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  8. Thank you all for the lovely compliments!

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  9. This is beautiful! I'm usually not a fan of that aqua color, but I must say, it looks beautiful with that print! Can't wait to see it on a body! :)

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  10. This is so so so beautiful!
    And truly great color combo!

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  11. i am absolutely in love in this corset!!!
    will definitely have to make one like this myself

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  12. Looks beautiful, and I love the seafoam green! Questions regarding lacing: the cording looks to be in quite a bulky knot, in the picture - is that how it will be when worn? How comfortable is it? You mentions satin ribbon as an alternative lace - do you mean ordinary fabric-store polyester satin ribbon, or silk ribbon, or something special from a corset-supplier? Because I've used polyester grosgrain ribbon in hair, and, sister, it does NOT stay tied. How secure is the satin and/or what kind of knot would you use? Thanks.

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    1. The cording is bulkier than ribbon lacing. To be honest, I'm not sure how I feel about it. It is certainly strong, but it doesn't handle as nicely as ribbon. When using ribbon I prefer double sided satin, it doesn't have to be silk though. The satin glides through the grommets and stays tied in a regular knot, tied the same as you would shoelaces.

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  13. Just double-sided . . .
    Great - thank you.
    (sorry - couldn't get the "reply" to work - my computer kept saying "javascript" but not why

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  14. It's gorgeous! The colors contrast beautifully and the curves are so dreamy!!
    I wish i had the pattern but i will do the post edwardian corset. By the way, i've been looking for fabric but here in my city is impossible to find coutil. And all the fabrics are so elastic and light. So the best i could find it's brocade, can you please reccomend me another fabric? Here, the best you find it's expensive taffeta silk or just taffeta, there's no variety.

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    1. Thank you Celeste! Look for a tightly woven plain weave fabric. People often confuse heavy fabric with strong fabric, but so many extant corsets I see were made with lightweight but incredibly tightly woven fabric, and very often that fabric is a plain weave. The white fabric used to flatline the Liberty Print to for this corset is not coutil, it's a tightly woven, cotton, shirting fabric. Don't use twill weaves because they stretch. If you are making your corset from two layers cut one on the straight and one on the cross grain to assure there is no give in either direction. I hope this helps!

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  15. Oh, it is so lovely! 'Sigh....!' Wish I could buy coutil in my city too. Looked high and low, online (too X$) and offline (media, nothing). I have also given up on bask and steel boning. Brocades are really costly here too. I am just starting out and don't want to ruin good quality fabric as yet. Do you think denims, hooks and eyes and whale bone will work? What do you recommend for a starter like me? By the way, which sewing machine are you using, to sew those thick layers? ... sorry, just got here and saw your beautiful corset. :)

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    1. Hi Laura! Hooks and eyes aren't the greatest closure for a corset. They can rip out from stress, or gap, but if you're starting use what you have. Just make sure you put some boning right next to the hooks. That should minimize gaps or puckers by supporting the fabric near the center front. You can also make the corset without one, just be sure se longer laces so you can pull on over your head. Avoid denim, it stretches. Artificial whalebone will work. Rigiline is not strong enough, it will bend. A better substitute for coutil is a strong, tightly woven canvas. I sew on a 1960 Singer 401 A. It's a wonderful machine. Thanks for reading, and happy corset making!

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  16. It's definitly me favourite corset, ohlalala amazing tissu ! Your work stunning ! (sorry for my english...) Bests regards

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