February 13, 2012

1911 - finishing bottom edge


Wow. Week seven of the sew along. Just a bit of finishing and our corsets will be complete, right on schedule. Yea. Today we'll finalize the shaping of the top and bottom edges, and sew the trim to the bottom. Thanks for the input regarding trim colors for my corset. I decided to go with the aqua. The red did seem more predictable, and I've already gone crazy with the Liberty print, why get predictable now? So, let's not dilly dally, to the sewing machine!

Throw some laces through those newly set grommets and try the corset on. If you want to change the shape of the top or bottom edges neatly draw the desired line with chalk, or you can use artist's tape, to mark the top and bottom edges. Once you've determined the shape cut the excess off. To make certain both halves are the same I cut one side, lay it on top of the other, face to face, mark the other side, then cut.


Then finish the bottom of the corset by placing 2 inch wide bias trim next to the edge, face to face, and stitch the trim anywhere from 1/4 to 1/2 inch from the edge. I sewed mine 3/8 of an inch from the edge.


Fold the bias over the allowance and press.


Wrap the bias trim over the edge of the corset, folding the raw edge of the trim under.


Sew 1/16 from the original seam.


Here is the trim from the exterior of the corset, and the interior.


The ends can either be tucked in, or just cut off. Leaving them raw is perfectly period! Here are the edges on the original post Edwardian I used to make the pattern.


It took a lot of wear to fray the raw edge to that point. Will your corset get that much wear? If not and you don't feel like fiddling with folding trim go ahead and cut it off. I'm think of living dangerously myself and not tucking the ends when I sew the trim on top. Tomorrow we'll insert the boning!

13 comments:

  1. I'm quite a bit behind, but I have this week off so I'm intending to catch up. I have just cut the coutil layer out.

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  2. With a week off you'll catch up in no time!

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    1. I hope so! Just a quick question- when you flatlined your beautiful thin fabric with the coutil, did you use any bonding agent? Like tacky spray or bondaweb? Or did you simply baste them together in the seam allowance? I'm not sure how to do mine, my fashion fabric is very thin and I've never used coutil before, but it seems quite thick. I'm worried the top layer may move unless I use something to 'stick' it.

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    2. I also want to know this. I once tried to use some iron on...something, but it just came loose again.

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  3. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  4. Have we seen this yet? Just wanted to share it, it's classic:
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/300561179573?ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1423.l2649#ht_5019wt_716

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  5. I used bondaweb on my fabrics (available at SewCurvy) and was lucky enough to use the professional press in the dressmaking classroom (I follow dressmaking courses at local school). Worked like a charm, not one wrinkle not one piece moved! The result is a pattern fabric on the outside and a white herringbone coutil on the inside, very strong and a lot less see through.

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    1. I'm worried it will feel like cardboard if I use bondaweb. I wonder what would happen if I just interface it, then baste it to the coutil? Any experience Jo?

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  6. My experience withI haven't had the best luck with fusible interfacings. I've heard pert of the problem is that a home iron does not heat as high as a commercial press so you never get a great bond. For this corset, and others in the past, I used quilter's basting spray. I like it because it gives a temporary hold and I can smooth wrinkles out, unlike wonder under. I saves time over hand basting, and since basting stitches just temporarily hold the layers together during construction and are removed anyway, serves the same purpose. I've also found the iron adhesives alter the fabric too much for my liking. They kill the grain of the fabric and any drape is lost. The drape of fabric is so important, even in corsets where it's easy to think rigidity is what you after. It's not. But that's me, other's experiences differ, they use permanent bonding and have great results.

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    1. I've had good results with plain-weave 100% cotton fusible interfacing -- aligning the grain of the interfacing with the grain of the fashion fabric will preserve the latter's pliability and bias whilst removing any shifty- or floppyness. It doesn't make the fashion fabric feel cardboardy at all, unlike most non-woven fusible interfacings I've tried. I've even used it on particularly flimsy fashion fabrics to turn into bias tape -- worked like a charm.

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  7. Now that we're working with the "real thing", what is the correct way of lacing up the corset? Top to bottom with ears in the middle or bottom to top? How do you secure the ends of the laces? Just in a bow? Thanks!

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    1. I'll be posting about lacing later today!

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