June 22, 2012

working with the prettiest things


Look what I got to photograph.

© Kent State University Museum, accession number 1983.1.8ab

Wow. This circa 1760 robe a la francaise will be on view as part of the Kent State University Museum's upcoming Fashion Timeline exhibit. While the curator and I were dressing it I snapped a couple pictures of the interior.


The yellow silk faille used for this gown is 49 centimeters wide, or just a bit over 19 inches. The seam allowances are a centimeter wide and the pink and blue selvedges create playful stripes running up the inside of the petticoat and robe. A plain old running stitch was used to assemble the panels of the petticoat and robe, and tiny whip stitches connect the bodice of the robe to the linen lining. Here you can see the stitching at the back of the bodice behind the pleats.


There are more pictures of the gown over at the museum's blog. The museum has such a wonderful collection, I really should to make an effort to share more of the lovely garments I work with. It seems like the least I can do since I have no progress on my corsets to share. Tsk, tsk.

12 comments:

  1. Gwah! WHAT A BEAUTIFUL GOWN! My favorite color, and such a stunning cut too! I envy your job so SO much

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    1. It is a beauty. I'm so fortunate!

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  2. The museum has such a wonderful collection, I really should to make an effort to share more of the lovely garments I work with. It seems like the least I can do since I have no progress on my corsets to share. Tsk, tsk.

    I know how you feel - I've been taking pictures at my internship and I want to share them in lieu of any sewing progress. But my pictures aren't very good. :/

    What a pretty francaise! I don't love that color on me but in a historical context it's great.

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  3. I can't tell you how many times I said "that is such a pretty dress!" while preparing it for exhibit. There is nothing timid about that yellow. It is so sunshine-y it must have brightened the rooms of dimly lit chateau.

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    1. Whoops! I meant chateaux. Is it obvious I don't speak French?"

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  4. I love the yellow gowns from the 1760s. Just stunning!
    -Emily

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  5. :o Oh, that is so pretty. I am sooo envious of your job, it sounds awesome, if you get to see these beautiful things a lot~

    If only it were blue...(I'm obsessed with blue)

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  6. Dear Jo,
    Oh you are so lucky to have access to so many wonderful objects. From the work I'm doing, I've come to realize that Kent State has one of the largest study collections in North America. Hopefully I'll get to visit there at some point.
    Best wishes!

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    1. I am lucky! We do have a wonderful collection, I was so excited when I began working there and I am still just as excited to show up each day. Be sure to let me know if you plan a visit!

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  7. Oh, what a beauty! I love the pinked self-fabric trim on this type of dress. Thank you so much for pics of the inside-I love seeing how the garments were made. I like this site http://www.vintagetextile.com/victorian.htm because it has good images of the interior.

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  8. oh this is beautiful! im going to be doing a workshop soon where we will be making 18th century gowns! The details on this are gorgeous...I will be printing this out and using this as some inspiration! Thanks for sharing

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